In terms of the most commonly used types of counter surveillance, it is not unusual for many industries to employ regular bug sweeping of their premises or utilise spy camera detectors to ensure their actions aren’t being monitored by competitors or adversaries. Answering questions on counter surveillance will highlight the importance of this principle in terms of national security and keeping the data of companies safe. Below are just some of the most commonly asked counter surveillance questions:

Q: What Exactly Is Counter Surveillance?

A: Counter surveillance is essentially a means of keeping secrets safe. Most major corporations across the world spend millions of pounds a year on counter surveillance in order to ensure their business practices aren’t compromised. Counter surveillance is also very important when it comes to combating terrorism.

Q: Who Needs Counter Surveillance?

A: Obviously, counter surveillance methods are regularly employed by governmental agencies such as the CIA, FBI and MI5. However, due to increasing competition in the consumer market place, most commercial industries can benefit from counter surveillance tools being installed on their premises.

Q: How Do Listening Device Sweeps Work?

A: Detecting listening devices is an integral part of counter surveillance and it is a highly technical procedure. It will require various electronic tests and an actually physical sweep of the area to ensure that bugging devices aren’t in operation. When it comes to counter surveillance, a sweep for listening devices will typically include radio spectrum analysis, phone line inspection and various checks on technological equipment on the company premises.

AV Security has been operating for over 15 years, supplying electronic audio, telephone and counter-surveillance equipment to a wide range of clients, including businesses and Government agencies. To find out more about the equipment we offer and our expertise in the market, email info@avsecurity.com, call + 353 87 2528777 or fill in our contact form here.